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Brief analysis: Cyprus in the line of fire

Cyprus finds itself with a front row seat for the latest developments in the Eastern Mediterranean as a potential attack on Syria looms

This is the situation in the eastern Mediterranean at the moment with both the fleets of Russia and NATO having assumed battle positions in view of the threats launched by Washington, that they are “ready to strike Damascus and the Presidential palace, irrespective of the presence of Russian personnel” and with Moscow responding that they will strike the positions any missiles are launched from.

It looks like I have a front row seat to anything that might come out of those threats, considering that the #1 U.S. lapdog, the United Kingdom, has military bases on our island that are unlikely to be ignored if the brown stuff hits the fan.

The Naval forces that are known to be in the area are:

For Russia: Two frigates that passed through the Aegean on Thursday night and Friday morning, one capable of launching Kalibr missiles. Another frigate already in the Eastern Mediterranean with the same capabilities. A total of five warships (frigates and corvettes), two supply ships, one electronic warfare vessel and three conventional submarines capable of launching cruise missiles, two of which are Kilo II class. (Last spotted east of the island of Crete.)

The two frigates that crossed the Aegean are the Admiral Grigorovich and the anti-submarine frigate Paitvi (class Krivak II).

For the United States: The entire 6th fleet with surface vessels and submarines. Another four ships, the USS Oak Hill, the Iwo Jima, the USS New York (built from the steel of the Twin Towers), and the USNS William McClean, are engaged in exercises with the Israeli forces in the area.

Obviously, the U.S. Navy is in the region with a much more numerous and powerful force as the 6th fleet alone is led by an aircraft carrier, of which Russia only has one, which is not to be found in the Mediterranean.

What must also be considered is that NATO countries also maintain a naval presence, with France contributing two frigates currently south of Cyprus, and Germany contributing one frigate. Italy had a frigate in the area until recently, but it sailed westwards to an unknown location.

Turkey, meanwhile, having reserved (for exercises) an area covering a strip of water south of Cyprus, is known to have six ships and three subs in the area.

For those whose comments consist of just one word: “source,” I have this to say: this information does not come from one single source. It is gleaned from info released by the United States Department of Defense, the Russian Department of Defense, Turkish reports on ships crossing the Bosporous Straits, Greek reports on ships crossing the Aegean, Cypriot reports on ships calling in Limassol harbor to resupply, and other reports that are all pieced together. No “magic link.”

Certain other comments that I have received on Facebook include: “I live on Cyprus and nothing like that is happening,” akin to “I live in the UK and can confirm it was the Russians who attempted to kill that agent with a chemical agent.”

Also, Cyprus is not building an airport or a Naval base for Russian military purposes. The only thing that exists between Cyprus and Russia is an old agreement, recently renewed, by which Russian Ships can refuel and resupply in Cypriot ports. No facilities for the Russian air force.

Again, I would like to stress, for those that could not figure it out for themselves, the map was indicative, the ships are NOT to scale therefore their positions are not exact, though the Russian ships are positioned generally more to the east, between Cyprus and Syria.

Opinions expressed are those of the author alone and may not reflect the opinions and viewpoints of Hellenic Insider, its publisher, its editors, or its staff, writers, and contributors.

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