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The death of Alexis Grigoropoulos: CIA destabilization over Russian gas pipelines?

Almost a decade later, the case of Alexis Grigoropoulos presents more questions than answers. How is the Grigoropoulos case related to Operation Pythia, the destructive fires of 2007 and repeated scandals leading to the downfall of the Karamanlis government, oil and gas pipeline deals with the Russians, and the economic crisis which followed?

Alexis Grigoropoulos

Background

This is the decade of the 2000s, when deals were being cut between Italy, Greece, France and Russia over delivering Russian oil and gas from the South. The United States, busy spending billions on its unipolar wars, was proceeding full steam ahead in destabilizing the weak link in the chain, which was none other than Greece.

During this decade, Greece suffered fires of unimaginable magnitude, phone tapping scandals, and even attempts at murdering an elected prime minister by what has become known since then as a CIA destabilization plan. The decade ended with violent disturbances over the fatal shooting of a 15-year old schoolboy, Alexis Grigoropoulos, while the new decade kicked off with constant weather modification issues that recently resulted with dozens of deaths in flash floods in an area known as Mandra on the outskirts of Athens.

Russian Documentary

There was an extensive documentary that was aired some time ago on the Russia 24 news channel which made reference to the “Pythia” plan, which encompassed the ex-prime minister Konstantinos Karamanlis over the South Stream gas pipeline and the fomenting of destabilization in Greece.

Russia 24 referred to the “insurrection” of December 2008 after the murder of Alexis Grigoropoulos and mentioned that from 2009 the FSB uncovered discussions with the CIA agents which referred to removing the Greek prime minister from his position.

During that period, a close friend of Karamanlis’ by the name of Christos Zahopoulos, who had been appointed to a prominent position in the ministry of culture allegedly attempted suicide, falling off a five-story building after it was revealed he maintained an office affair and he felt guilty explaining the situation to his wife! A reaction which had previously been unheard of in Greece, mind you. But this was simply a warning.

In the summer of 2007, Greece was burnt to smithereens via two massive fires in the Peloponnese region and in the Parnitha mountain range north of Athens, while in December of 2008 riots ensued for one month. The aura created at the time was that the government had lost control, with demands allegedly for martial law. The government’s mandate was until 2011, but eventually they went for early elections in 2009. In other words, the government was brought down and one of the first measures taken by the incoming government of George Papandreou was the cancellation of the Russian gas contracts.

What happened with Alexis Grigoropoulos?

As the story goes, allegedly the police were passing by in a car in the “radical” Exarchia neighborhood of Athens, and Alexis and his friends threw rocks at it. Police got out and shot at them, killing Alexis. The video that has been produced is grainy, taken in the night, and no one can make heads or tails of it. Whilst Alexis was a resident of the well-to-do northern suburbs of Athens, he was buried in the south of Athens, in a left-wing area. His coffin was a closed casket – again unusual. The mainstream media circulated he was an “anarchist” at the ripe old age of 15. The pictures they circulated sometimes were from a real victim of disturbances, Mihalis Kaltezas.

On the night of Alexis’ murder and within an hour or so of its occurrence, there were disturbances in a number of cities which continued for a number of days. They reached a crescendo of burning local businesses and migrants were employed to loot them. Foreign participants flew over from the UK, for instance, to take part. Social media went almost global over the event.

December 2008 is widely regarded as the time Twitter “took off” as a social medium in Greece. And since that time, the Greek “twittersphere” has been a stronghold of “antifa” and self-styled “leftists,” and to a lesser extent, a “liberal” and pro-technocracy contingent. The thread connecting these two elements is their absolute love for the EU and globalism, the incredibly coordinated manner in which they seem to have responded to events such as the Grigoropoulos shooting in 2008, and the almost simultaneous disappearance or sudden inactivity of many such prominent Twitter accounts soon after SYRIZA’s electoral victory in January 2015.

For example, soon after the large-scale fires of 2007, Greece’s first-ever protests purportedly organized via SMS text messaging and by bloggers “spontaneously” appeared in Athens and other large cities. Organizers of these demonstrations were later said to have participated in the December 2008 disturbances, in addition to involvement with such groups as the Athens Indymedia Center, which also played a key role during the December 2008 riots. Also in 2007, an alleged police beating of a UK-born photographer during a demonstration in Thessaloniki went “viral,” in one of the earliest such instances in Greece. The individual in question is later said to have participated in the December 2008 disturbances. Could all of this have been a coordinated prelude to what was to follow in Greece?

What actually happened?

It is beyond reasonable doubt that Grigoropoulos wasn’t an “anarchist” and never had any political involvement. According to the same mainstream media reports his family, soon after his death, said that he was friends with police and hated violence, while Grigoropoulos’ friends stated that if he was alive he would have condemned all the subsequent events in his name. But most of these reports disappeared as per the account which follows.

A special policeman by the name of Epameinondas Korkoneas is said to have shot Grigoropoulos dead at almost point blank range for unexplained reasons or reasons to do with allegedly throwing a bottle of beer at a police car. As if one bottle threatened the police enough to warrant a shooting? Subsequently the state invented a character who was allegedly friends with Alexis by the name of Nikos Romanos, who then became a hardcore “anarchist” constantly in and out of prison.

Romanos recounted a totally different story than the one circulated at the time, but hey, the mainstream media control the narrative and make it up as they go along, as they have done with so many other events the world over pertaining to “terrorism.” Romanos is the son of George Nazioutsik, who owns a 55-acre wedding venue and museum on the outskirts of Athens in total opulence. What actual issues of oppression did a rich boy in Greece face in 2009? None. This is Greece we are talking about, where the rich youth can spend months in the summer in nightclubs on the islands and in the winter can travel to northern Europe. This isn’t pre-revolutionary Russia with the absolutism of the Tsars and Narodnya Volya where Lenin’s brothers were killed in terrorist actions.

Therefore, speculating as to what actually happened as we won’t know for certain until government files are made public, we arrive at three possible scenarios. One scenario involves special forces bumping off Grigoropoulos to spark a riot, a hybrid war of destabilization against the Karamanlis regime as part of the “Pythia” plan. In a second scenario, he died of other causes (such as drugs), while in a third scenario, Grigoropoulos was exported to the “land of the free and the home of the brave,” the good ol’ US of A and was used as a … “victim” of a “police shootout.”

The plan was so well organized that rocks from the beach areas were present in demonstrations, brought into Athens by trucks so the young protestors could have a large supply of objects to throw at the police. It’s as if the state was fighting the state and the protestors were pawns in the middle. The volume of shops attacked was vast, and videos surfaced of migrants looting small Greek-owned businesses. This was the period when protests had already started in central Athens against the presence of swarms of illegal migrants who lived in public squares, literally turning them into public latrines.

The funeral of Alexis in Athens

Despite being a resident of the wealthy northern suburbs of Athens, Alexis was buried in the south of Athens, in a working-class district and specifically in the Neos Kosmos-Palaio Faliro graveyards. Thousands of youth arrived and the police deliberately targeted them. They tear gassed a funeral cortege so as to create more mayhem. It’s as if the state was saying: we will bump your children off and then attack the mourners as if this were occupied Palestine.

The actual funeral was with a closed casket and if one reviews the videos of the era, one sees the paid presstitutes arguing that Karamanlis enjoyed no popular support, that there was a social explosion (at least 4 years prior to unemployment officially reaching 30 percent) due to the fraud of Vatopedi (priests selling off land in the monastic region of Agion Oros), etc. Something doesn’t add up.

Court Case 8 Years Later and counting…

Two policemen were charged for the murder, Korkoneas and Vasilis Saraliotis: Korkoneas for the actual shooting, and Skaraliotis for indirectly supporting him. Zoe Konstantopoulou, the former president of Greece’s Parliament in the first SYRIZA government, has become the lawyer for Alexis’ mother, Ms. Tsalikian. The irony of the situation is that in 2017, she stated in court, under oath, that the murder of her son was part of this aforementioned “Pythia” plan, essentially stating that the policeman who murdered her son was a U.S. agent. She also stated that her son was only in Exarchia to celebrate Romanos’ birthday. In a video interview recorded in 2010, Alexis’ mother stated that her son was killed for no reason.

Now, taking into account this event happened in 2008, we are dealing with a “court case” that has been ongoing for nearly a decade. This begs the question, is it a court case or just a continuation of the propaganda regarding this whole issue and the characters involved are there to continue this event? We have two sets of explanations by Alexis’ mother with regards to the causes of her son’s death, separated by almost a decade. Since 2008, the issue of the CIA destabilization plans have gone mainstream as a number of media have published various accounts regarding this topic, and so as to not appear to be left out of the loop the storyline changes.

Who is Alexis’ mother, Jina Tsalikian?

Just as Grigoropoulos’ alleged friend Romanos is the son of someone who is wealthy by Greek standards, Alexis’ mother owned a gold jewelry store in Athens’ premier shopping street, known as Voukourestiou. Jina was married to a banker, so she is known in high society. Not long ago after divorcing, she married a ship owner. It is alleged she had a close personal relationship with Dora Bakogianni, the daughter of Greece’s former prime minister and close friend of the Bush family, Konstantinos Mitsotakis. The Mitsotakis clan were well-known CIA supporters from the mid-1960s. This family has been pivotal at all turning points in Greece’s latter-day history, from bringing down a Papandreou government in the mid-1960’s, to the issues surrounding the “restoration” of “democracy” in the mid-1970s after the colonels’ coup and subsequent dictatorship, and in the issues surrounding the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990’s. What we can see is that the security services of Greece serve different foreign powers depending on the situation. As for Tsalikian, it was also reported she was compensated to the tune of 800,000 euro following the murder of her son.

Looking back at this period, one can see the establishment ended up playing a double role. They undermined the government to such an extent that it was forced to resign and declare early elections in 2009 instead of the scheduled elections in 2011. This comes in stark contrast to today’s situation, where the SYRIZA-led government are doing everything in their power to postpone elections and stay in power for as long as possible. At the same time, the establishment trained the paramilitary police, both in official uniform and plain clothes, for the events that were to rock Greece in the next decade. Indeed, one of the first measures of the newly elected Papandreou government was to block the gas pipeline agreement with Russia. Nothing, it appears, goes to waste in the CIA Disneyland that is Greece. The question that now concerns us is this: do we have a shift in U.S. foreign policy and will Russia be allowed to sell gas and oil to the Southern European states as they do with the northern countries, or will CIA destabilization continue?

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