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How the super rich EU elite steal their citizens money in a simple four step process

After Spain, after Greece and especially after Cyprus, the pattern should now be tattooed in all EU citizens’ brains.

The government gets into some sort of financial trouble. Its leadership denies there’s a problem and goes on record saying everything is OK.  What then follows, to everyone’s surprise, is a quick sudden wealth grab.

To protect your savings and help you recognise the next time your government elitists are about to pull a fast one on your hard earned cash, the International Man blog has created a nice and simple primer of the tells that give away the next confiscation plot.

It starts out with government officials telling you everything is all right—when clearly everything is not all right.

Like when the president of Cyprus promised that bank deposits would be safe. A promise that we all know turned out to be worthless. Another example of why you’re almost always better off believing the opposite of whatever the government says, especially in a crisis.

Deceptions like this don’t happen by accident. The politicians and media deliberately lull the people into complacency so that they can optimize their forthcoming theft.

The next thing that happens needs to come as a surprise, otherwise it loses its effectiveness. It starts with a bank holiday or capital controls. It’s usually optimal—from the government’s view—to impose these measures on weekends or during a holiday to catch people off guard. They need the element of surprise or else people would take protective measures, like moving their money abroad and safely out of reach.

Once the banks are closed and capital is trapped, the government is free to confiscate as much wealth as it can get away with. It doesn’t matter what they call it or how they do it, the bottom line is they are making an unscrupulous grab. Capital controls are usually kept in place after the grab to prevent the remaining money from fleeing further slaughter.

So don’t forget the pattern:

Country gets into serious financial trouble;
Official government denials;
Surprise bank holiday/capital controls; and
Confiscation.

And here is the International Man’s prediction as to who is next on the EU robbery list…

I think Portugal is a ripe candidate for being the next country to fall into this pattern.

In late July 2014, Banco Espírito Santo (BES)—Portugal’s second-largest bank—went bust amid allegations of accounting problems and fraud.

BES is no ordinary bank. The Espírito Santo family, which owned the bank and a large empire of companies in Portugal and abroad, has been described as Portugal’s Rockefellers.

BES was quickly bailed out by the Portuguese government, the EU, and the IMF.

When I read about the incident in the mainstream financial media, most outlets refused to use the word “bailout.” Instead, it seemed that someone handed down the order to describe the event as a “rescue.” Such a concerted effort to coordinate talking points seems to me to be an Orwellian attempt to make this incident seem less objectionable, and perhaps to help conceal the real nature of Europe’s continued economic problems.

The fact that such a huge fraud at such a significant bank for so long escaped the notice of regulators—which supposedly had kept a close watch on Portugal due to a prior crisis in 2011—has reinforced fears that the banks and banking systems of the PIIGS countries (Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece, and Spain) are not as good as they seem.

So looking at our roadmap to confiscation, Portugal is clearly at the first stage in the pattern—serious financial trouble.

We also have government officials telling us everything is OK when it is probably too early to declare victory. Mario Draghi, the head of the ECB, recently stated that the collapse of BES “affected neither the banking sector in Portugal, nor Portugal at large, nor other markets.” It’s reminiscent of how, prior to the crisis in Cyprus, government officials were assuring everyone that there was nothing to worry about. Portugal also seems to be at stage two of our confiscation roadmap.

So in short we have another serious financial mess in Portugal. It occurred right under the noses of the regulators who were supposedly keeping a close watch on the country from a prior bailout and crisis in 2011. We have the media sugarcoating the incident, and government officials telling us everything is fine.

To me, it smells like a wealth confiscation in Portugal is just around the corner.

Hopefully many ordinary, working citizens in Portugal will wake up to what is going on and protect their bank savings before the EU mafia begins its confiscation plans. If you have any money in a Portuguese bank, time to get out. Be weary of upcoming bank holidays and three day weekends.

Unless you’re part of the political elite (the mafia in Brussels that is hungry for more cash) you will not know when the confiscation will begin.

In Cyprus, the robbery tool place on an ordinary Saturday morning during a seemingly innocent three day weekend, after President Anastasiades assured all Cypriot citizens that everything was under control. It was a surprise attack (as all good bank robberies are) and the majority of people were not able to take defensive action against the confiscation.

Of course President Anastasiades was able to move roughly 28 million Euros abroad a week before the hit took place…one of the perks of being on the inside of the EU mafia family.

References:

http://www.internationalman.com/articles/is-portugal-next-in-line-for-wealth-confiscation

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